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astro300_f17:day4 [2017/09/06 19:14]
ccheng [Homework]
astro300_f17:day4 [2017/09/06 22:37] (current)
tzick [General Takeaways]
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   - Deeper conceptual knowledge CAN be probed with multiple choice questions, but writing effective questions takes time and practice. ​   - Deeper conceptual knowledge CAN be probed with multiple choice questions, but writing effective questions takes time and practice. ​
   - Especially when writing free response questions, it can be useful to develop a grading rubric for each question as a way of ensuring that your questions are specific, clear, and not testing the same concept over and over again.   - Especially when writing free response questions, it can be useful to develop a grading rubric for each question as a way of ensuring that your questions are specific, clear, and not testing the same concept over and over again.
-  - When answering homework/​material questions, be it over email, at TALC or office hours, try to guide students in the correct direction rather than simply showing them the solution. Asking questions to help them reason through the problem usually works well. 
  
  
-=====Section Recap (20 minutes)=====+ 
 +=====Section Recap (15 minutes)=====
  
 Remind them that this is something we intend to do every week and that everyone should come prepared to share about how their previous sections went.  Remind them that this is something we intend to do every week and that everyone should come prepared to share about how their previous sections went. 
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    * What were you thinking about while you were running section? Any moments of panic?    * What were you thinking about while you were running section? Any moments of panic?
  
-(20 minutes) ​Open the floor up for general questions and sharing about how sections are going.+Open the floor up for general questions and sharing about how sections are going.
  
 ===== Multiple Choice and Free Response Questions (40 min) ====== ===== Multiple Choice and Free Response Questions (40 min) ======
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     * Talk (probably through e-mail) to students in your section(s) who performed very poorly (grades of less than 40% or 50%).  They may be too shy to ask for help even if they know they need it!     * Talk (probably through e-mail) to students in your section(s) who performed very poorly (grades of less than 40% or 50%).  They may be too shy to ask for help even if they know they need it!
  
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-=====Office Hours & Answering Questions (15 minutes - if there'​s time)===== 
-This is in particular relevant to the lab-based courses (Ay120, Python class) where most of the GSI interaction is in the form of office hours or emails to answer questions on assignments. These are also useful in TALC. 
- 
-Group discussion - you've probably been doing this but making it more explicit: 
-  * (5 min) General office hour/email experiences so far (if not yet discussed). ​ 
-    * Have there been people coming? ​ 
-    * What kind of questions have you been getting? ​ 
-    * How are you handling them? 
-    * Specially for lab courses where the course is focused on implementation/​execution,​ what kinds of questions have you been getting? Are they high level or very technical? 
-  * (5 min) When you get questions from students on homework questions, how do/should you handle them? 
-    * General strategy: Identify where the confusion is and address it 
-        * Identifying the confusion: ask them to explain the problem to you as best as they can and see where they run into trouble 
-        * What kind of confusion is it: misunderstanding?​ unable to grasp what the goal of the task it? forget a step? math error? 
-        * Address the source of the confusion and have them attempt the problem again 
-    * In general, we want to push the question back to them, but in a different/​leading way. 
-        * e.g. How do I find the location of the star in my data? How would you answer that 
-            * e.g. Where do you think it is? What did your brain just do to try to figure out where it is? How could I put that in mathematical/​programming terms to implement it? (Basically what I've done is taken a higher level question, and thought of some lower level questions that can guide me to the answer) 
-    * Learning how to problem solve and get to the answer are skills we want to teach 
-    * We don't want the reason they did something to be: "The GSI told me to do it this way" 
-  * (3 min) Debugging (specific to lab/python) 
-    * How to handle debugging issues? Ask for opinions 
-      * When do you help them?  
-      * Avoid spiral of debugging everyone'​s code  
-    * General rule for Astrolab: because the class does not explicitly prereq coding, especially at the beginning, help them debug but also use it to teach them how to debug (print statements, pdb, how to use IDEs, how to use Google) 
-  * (2 min) When should you just give them the answer? 
-      * Things that do not really contribute to the learning objectives 
-        * Math errors: 1+1=3? (Exception: equations in wrong units) 
-        * Coding API questions (how do I make an array in numpy, what is the argument to do...) 
-        * Things that take a long time to figure out how to get, but don't have very much benefit to learning (examples?)