Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
housing [2019/05/06 17:51]
michaelmedford
housing [2019/05/06 17:52] (current)
tzick old revision restored (2019/05/06 17:50)
Line 27: Line 27:
 Most people don't realize that you are competing to get the best apartments. Before you even look at an apartment, put together a tenant resume. This is a list of references, bank accounts, etc that show the landlord that you can afford the apartment and are a good risk. You can download a blank resume ​ [[http://​www.ehousing.com/​cgi/​pdf/​RR2001.PDF|here.]] You shouldn'​t worry about giving a landlord your bank account numbers; without your PIN, they can only make deposits or check balances. **PKGW comments:** It is true that you're competing for the best apartments, but I've never found the tenant resume to be helpful. If you think that you might want to sign on a place at the viewing, it's useful to have your bank account info and such around, but pretty much everyone will want you to fill out an application of their design which asks for all the information that would go into such a resume. Most people don't realize that you are competing to get the best apartments. Before you even look at an apartment, put together a tenant resume. This is a list of references, bank accounts, etc that show the landlord that you can afford the apartment and are a good risk. You can download a blank resume ​ [[http://​www.ehousing.com/​cgi/​pdf/​RR2001.PDF|here.]] You shouldn'​t worry about giving a landlord your bank account numbers; without your PIN, they can only make deposits or check balances. **PKGW comments:** It is true that you're competing for the best apartments, but I've never found the tenant resume to be helpful. If you think that you might want to sign on a place at the viewing, it's useful to have your bank account info and such around, but pretty much everyone will want you to fill out an application of their design which asks for all the information that would go into such a resume.
  
-You will also want to run a credit report on yourself to see what landlords ​will see when they run your credit report. CreditKarma provides free credit reports. Landlords will almost certainly charge you $30 to run this report on you as well.+You will also want to run a credit report on yourself. If you leave it for the landlord ​to do, they will usually charge you $30, but if you do it yourself, it's free. CreditKarma provides free credit reports. ​
  
 My strategy is, if you are remotely interested in an apartment, give the landlord your resume and credit report the first time you see the place. This is helpful in showing the landlord that you are organized. While the landlord checks your references, use that time to look at other apartments and decide whether you are still interested. When the landlord calls you to offer you the place, you can still say no. My strategy is, if you are remotely interested in an apartment, give the landlord your resume and credit report the first time you see the place. This is helpful in showing the landlord that you are organized. While the landlord checks your references, use that time to look at other apartments and decide whether you are still interested. When the landlord calls you to offer you the place, you can still say no.
Line 34: Line 34:
  
 ===Advanced Strategy=== ===Advanced Strategy===
 +
 +CAUTION: This is about a decade out of date
  
 So I hesitate to bring this up... but the rent that an apartment is listed for is not set in stone. It is possible, but risky, to bargain with landlords. It's most effective when there aren't many prospective tenants for an apartment; i.e. there aren't many people looking for 5 bedroom houses in March. I once found myself in this situation looking at a 5 bedroom in the Berkeley Hills that was asking $5500. We submitted an application,​ but offered only $3500. Two weeks passed, and the house was advertised on craigslist for $4500. I contacted the agent and reminded him about our offer, but they weren'​t interested. I continued calling the agent a couple times a week to see if they responded to our offer, but I didn't hear anything for about a month. Then I offered $3600 to see if that got any response; they came back with $3500, which made no sense. We split the difference with $3550; we've been living in the house now for more than a year. If you're a BADgrad, you'll probably come to a party here at some point. ​ So I hesitate to bring this up... but the rent that an apartment is listed for is not set in stone. It is possible, but risky, to bargain with landlords. It's most effective when there aren't many prospective tenants for an apartment; i.e. there aren't many people looking for 5 bedroom houses in March. I once found myself in this situation looking at a 5 bedroom in the Berkeley Hills that was asking $5500. We submitted an application,​ but offered only $3500. Two weeks passed, and the house was advertised on craigslist for $4500. I contacted the agent and reminded him about our offer, but they weren'​t interested. I continued calling the agent a couple times a week to see if they responded to our offer, but I didn't hear anything for about a month. Then I offered $3600 to see if that got any response; they came back with $3500, which made no sense. We split the difference with $3550; we've been living in the house now for more than a year. If you're a BADgrad, you'll probably come to a party here at some point. ​